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Coming Soon - 3D Printing Today: How Industry is Using and Benefiting from Additive Manufacturing Technology

3D printing is fast on its way to becoming a mainstream technology. In May 2015, design engineers and managers across a wide range of OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturing) industries were surveyed by Signet Research to better understand how they are using 3D printing and the benefits they derive.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Will Google Glass make a comeback in the workplace?

This week's Question: According to The Wall Street Journal, Google has been distributing a new version of its smart eyewear, Google Glass, to companies, engineered specifically for professionals in workplaces like health care, manufacturing, and energy. The new version will have improved battery life, a faster processer, and a hinge that attaches the device to an existing pair of glasses. When first introduced on a limited basis in 2013, the device raised privacy concerns, even causing some establishments to enact "No Glass" policies. What do you think? Will Google Glass make a comeback in the workplace?  

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Products of Tomorrow: August 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Products

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NASA and Industry Create Mid-Infrared Detector

NASA Goddard scientist Xiaoli Sun and his industry partner, DRS Technologies (Dallas, TX), have created the world’s first photon-counting detector sensitive to the mid-infrared wavelength bands — a spectral sweet spot for a number of remote-sensing applications, including the detection of greenhouse gases on Earth, Mars, and other planetary bodies as well as ice and frost on comets, asteroids, and the Moon.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront

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A Tale of Tails

Tests were conducted recently by Boeing and NASA to answer the question: What if reducing the size of an aircraft’s tail could lead to more efficient air travel? The tests, focused on a technology called active flow control, are part of the Boeing ecoDemonstrator program. Active flow control is a technology that could result in a tail that is 17% smaller. This would reduce drag by about 0.5%, and would also reduce the tail’s weight, both of which cut an airplane’s fuel use and carbon emissions.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront

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Editor's Choice: August 2015

NASA is developing the next generation of radiators using a composite that combines low density, high thermal conductivity, and high strength. A scalable process was developed that incorporates nanoparticles into magnesium that forms a high-strength, high-thermal-conductivity nanocomposite. Other applications for this technology are consumer electronics, automobile components such as brake systems, drill bits, mining equipment, and corrosion-resistant coatings. Click HERE to find out more.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront

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Custom 3D Printers Revolutionize the Space Supply Chain

Additive manufacturing technology could enable future astronauts to build any part or piece needed on long-duration missions. A spaceflight crew has to bring with it everything it will need over the course of its journey. In space travel, not only is payload capacity at a premium, but objects carried into space also must be made to withstand the g-force and jarring vibrations of liftoff.

Posted in: Articles

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